Domoic acid contamination within eight representative species from the benthic food web of Monterey Bay, California, USA

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Kvitek, R. G., Goldberg, J. D., Smith, G. J., Doucette, G. J., & Silver, M. W. (2008). Domoic acid contamination within eight representative species from the benthic food web of Monterey Bay, California, USA. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 367, 35-47. doi:10.3354/meps07569
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TitleDomoic acid contamination within eight representative species from the benthic food web of Monterey Bay, California, USA
AuthorsR. Kvitek, J. Goldberg, G. Smith, G. Doucette, M. Silver
AbstractBenthic food webs often derive a significant fraction of their nutrient inputs from phytoplankton in the overlying waters. If the phytoplankton include harmful algal species like Pseudonitzschia australis, a diatom capable of producing the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), the benthic food web can become a depository for phycotoxins. We tested the general hypothesis that DA contaminates benthic organisms during local blooms of P. australis, a widespread toxin producer along the US west coast. To test for trophic transfer and uptake of DA into the benthic food web, we sampled 8 benthic species comprising 4 feeding groups: filter feeders (Emerita analoga and Urechis caupo); a predator (Citharichthys sordidus); scavengers (Nassarius fossatus and Pagurus samuelis) and deposit feeders (Neotrypaea californiensis, Dendraster excentricus and Olivella biplicata). Sampling occurred before, during and after blooms of P. australis in Monterey Bay, CA, USA during 2000 and 2001. DA was detected in all 8 species, with contamination persisting over variable time scales. Maximum DA levels in N. fossatus (674 ppm), E. analoga (278 ppm), C. sordidus (515 ppm), TV. californiensis (145 ppm), P. samuelis (56 ppm), D. excentricus (15 ppm) and O. biplicata (3 ppm) coincided with P. australis blooms, while DA levels in U. caupo remained above 200 ppm (max. = 751 ppm) throughout the study period. DA in 6 species exceeded levels thought to be safe for higher level consumers (i.e. ≥20 ppm) and thus is likely to have deleterious effects on marine birds, sea lions and the endangered California sea otter, known to prey upon these benthic species. © Inter-Research 2008.
JournalMarine Ecology Progress Series
Date2008
Volume367
Start page35
End page47
ISSN0171-8630
Subjectsalga, algal bloom, amino acid, benthos, biological uptake, endangered species, food web, hypothesis testing, marine pollution, mustelid, seabird, toxic organism, toxin, California, Monterey Bay, North America, United States, algae, Aves, Bacillariophyta, Carnivora, Citharichthys sordidus, Dendraster excentricus, Emerita analoga, Enhydra, Nassarius fossatus, Neotrypaea californiensis, Olivella biplicata, Otariidae, Pagurus samuelis, Pseudo-nitzschia, Pseudo-nitzschia australis, Urechis caupo
NoteCited By (since 1996):17, Ecology, CODEN: MESED

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